Embedding Employability Skills in Higher Education: The Quest for the Holy Grail?

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FBE-WCLA@unimelb.edu.au

Visiting Scholar


Abstract
This seminar will focus on a fundamental tension that educators face in higher education institutions worldwide. On the one hand, there is a shift in the focus of HE teaching practice towards improving the student experience, boosting student engagement, and increasing student satisfaction. On the other hand, evidence suggest that employers are dissatisfied with particular skill gaps among university graduates, for instance, in self-management, problem-solving, and team-working skills. The discussion of these issues will be placed in the context of macro-level changes towards marketization and digitalization, which affect higher education in the UK and beyond. The seminar lead will reflect on his experience, share his approach to partly resolving the tension, with a focus on the integration and nurturing of employability skills in small-group teaching. The seminar will be relevant to anyone engaged in HE teaching either from a research, pedagogical or practitioner background, as well as early-career researchers and doctoral students interested in pursuing a career in HE.

Biography
Andreas Kornelakis is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Management at King’s Business School, King’s College London. He is also an Associate Fellow of the ESRC-funded Digital Futures at Work Research Centre (DIGIT). He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and his research and teaching focuses on comparative management, HRM and employment relations. His research has been published in several ABDC A/A* journals such as: British Journal of Industrial Relations, ILR Review, Business History, Work Employment & Society, International Journal of HRM, among others. He is a Fellow of the UK’s Higher Education Academy and has more than 15 years of experience in HE research and teaching.