Anirudh Suthakar: Setting Sail

By Seth Robinson

How many students imagine sailing off into the sunset at the end of their degree? Whatever lies beyond the horizon, there are no shortage of ways to get there. Bachelor of Commerce graduate Anirudh Suthakar is taking the literal route, joining Ship for World Youth, a unique initiative hosted by the Japanese government.

Anirudh Suthakar graduated from the Bachelor of Commerce in November. He majored in Economics and Finance, rounding out his undergraduate career with honours studies in Finance.

“In a couple of sentences, I looked at concepts of security design and market efficiency in finance. I did a project with the Brain, Mind & Markets Lab here at the University of Melbourne, about how we can improve security design through an experimental framework.”

Ani Head
- Anirudh Suthakar.

Now, Anirudh is getting ready for a move to Sydney, and a new role with the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) – where he’ll be working on economics and finance policy – but first, he’ll be setting sail on the Ship for World Youth, a program that brings delegations of futures leaders from all over the world together for a tour including workshops, a homestay in Japan, and a five week journey aboard the Nippon Maru.

“So, going as part of the Australian delegation we have to be representatives for our country, and give a presentation about Australia. It’s about sharing cultures, and breaking down barriers between countries. I know some of the other delegations will be from Tanzania, Peru, Greece and of course, Japan!”

The program also includes a curriculum of classes run on board the ship, all aimed at building leadership skills and a sense of connection.

“I think everyone in this program has a strong community focus, so one of the key aims is to not only build these networks around the globe, but to really learn about other people’s experiences, so we can then take these lessons back to our communities and help improve global understanding. It’s as much about having an impact at home, as it is about getting together for the seven  weeks.”

It’s the perfect transition from life as an undergraduate into the working world. When Anirudh returns, he’ll be ready to settle into his new life in Sydney, a future leader eager to foster community connection and engagement. When it comes to what lies beyond that horizon, it’s hard to say.

“I’m excited to start my career, but exactly what the future looks like, I can’t say. I think there might be space for some more experimental work with the BMM Lab, perhaps even some more study or research. I really like the idea of working in education, if not formally, perhaps becoming a mentor. I think those programs are really valuable, and offer a lot of opportunities.”