Getting on with the job: the drivers of intergenerational joblessness

This project is unpacking the mechanisms, channels and factors that drive joblessness from one generation to the next.

The intergenerational transmission of joblessness

Aiming to unpack the mechanisms, channels and factors that drive joblessness from one generation to the next in Australia and across Europe, Asia and United States, this project is being run by the Melbourne Institute and the School of Social and Political Science.

The four-year Australian Research Council-funded project will:

  • map and examine the channels through which jobless families influence children’s labour force attachment during adulthood in Australia and across the selected countries,
  • investigate the role of family systems (family relationships, values, and norms about work) and how these mitigate or exacerbate effects of family joblessness in Australia within an international context, and
  • investigate the role of the unemployment and tax transfer system on family joblessness in Australia and countries with comparable yet contrasting welfare systems.

More information is available on the project's own website.

Impact

This project is expected to provide significant new knowledge and a critical mass of research on family joblessness, as well as detailed evidence-based knowledge that will help policy-makers determine new and more efficient ways to break family cycles of joblessness.

Investigators